The duality of human capacity for creation and destruction, as well as the mechanics of the sublime evoked by the complex dynamics of both extremes, inspire this preoccupation with the image, as a fluid and discursive field. This interest focuses on the descent - or rather, the erasure - of the image from its origin. This process, then, calls into question the referential weight of the image, the collective understanding it represents, and its liminal space between ideology and experience.

 

For me, re-contextualization is investigated through experimental process as a means of separation from the individual image’s unique tie to its referent.The cell phone is now, in a sense, the scale in which we see ourselves. Just like photography it is a transmitter of information. It is also a constant light source, which I find interesting in the sense that humans have always been drawn to light. Thinking about the destructive power of light when an atomic bomb is detonated, it was important to me that light be a destructive force in this project. I placed pieces of sheet film on top of my cell phone and exposed them to the images. The result produced a sort of solarized effect that removed the images from their iconic form and into an abstracted space.